Recent Storm Damage Posts

Ice Dams - What You Should Know

12/14/2020 (Permalink)

Ice Dam infographic If you have water damage from Ice Dams, please call SERVPRO of Cambridge/Belmont (617) 864-7378

Ice dams form when melted snow refreezes at roof edges. Anyone who has lived in cold climates has seen ice dams. However, most of us don’t stop to understand why these ice bands form until they damage our homes.

Three things are required for an ice dam to form: snow, heat to melt the snow and cold to refreeze the melted snow into solid ice. Ice dams can form when as little as 1 or 2 inches of snow accumulates on a roof – if the roof is poorly insulated and air sealed, and the snowfall is followed by several days of sub-freezing temperatures. Ice dams develop as snow on the upper part of the roof melts. Water runs down the roof slope under the blanket of snow and refreezes into a band of ice at the roof’s edge creating a “dam”. Additional snow-melt pools against the dam and eventually leaks into the building through the roof or roof trim.

The reason ice-dams form along the roof’s lower edge, usually above the overhang, is straight-forward. The upper roof surface is at a temperature that is above freezing. And the lower part of the roof surface (along the eaves) is below freezing. The upper roof surface is located directly above the living space. Heat lost from the house warms this section of the roof, melting snow in this area. During periods of sub-freezing temperature the lower regions of the roof deck remain at sub-freezing ambient temperatures. Roof overhangs are not warmed by indoor heat-loss.

Deeper snow and cold temperatures increase the likelihood and size of ice dams. Every inch of snow that accumulates on the roof’s surface insulates the roof deck a little more, trapping more indoor heat beneath the roof deck and warming the roof sheathing. Each inch of snow has an R-value of approximately 0.5 – 1. The worst ice dams occur when deep snow accompanies cold weather.  Here is an example to provide a sense of scale: A poorly insulated and unvented R-20 cathedral roof with 10 inches of snow can result with serious ice damming.  In this example, 10 inches of snow adds ~between R-5 and R-10 to the roof system resulting in a total roof R of 25 – 30. The layer of snow holds indoor heat below the sheathing and could warm the roof sheathing above freezing in the area over the living space. If the inside temperature is 70 degrees and the outside 20 degrees (50 degree differential), the temperature of the roof sheathing would be between 5/25 and 10/30 of the way from 20 degrees toward 70 degrees. In other words, the roof should temperature should be between 30 and 37 degrees over the living space. Snow will probably melt under these conditions. Yet, the temperature of the roof over the unheated overhangs is 20 degrees, the same as the outdoor temperature. The melt water will freeze when it reaches that part of the roof. Deeper snow makes things worse. More insulation makes the situation better. You can do the math for a variety of snow depths and various indoor/outdoor temperature conditions to get a sense of how the variables are related. The trick is to keep the entire roof below freezing if possible. Roof venting helps and is discussed below.

Why Our “Restore First” Mentality Is Best for Customers | SERVPRO® of Cambridge/Belmont

10/23/2020 (Permalink)

large red diamond shape sign with Natural Disaster written in large black print Have you sustained property damage and feeling overwhelmed? We are here to help, contact SERVPRO of Cambridge/Belmont.

If your home sustains damage for any reason, it can be a frustrating and fraught time for your entire family. There are many emotions that people will cycle through after a fire or other disaster, and having to go through the process of handling the damage can further complicate the recovery process.

While there are always difficulties to consider throughout the recovery period, having a good restoration company on your side can truly make all the difference.

We will work with you and your insurance company to make the entire procedure as seamless as possible, and with our restoration-first mentality, we will do our best to preserve your belongings so you do not have to replace them.

How Our Restoration-First Mentality Helps Our Clients

We can help you save money on your insurance. Homeowners insurance is designed to help you cover the cost of losses in case of many types of damage, but filing a claim can also raise your premium tremendously. In the event of water damage, for example, the average claim is over $10,000. We can help lower the cost you have to claim with insurance by restoring objects where possible.

We can protect your sentimental items. We have invested in some of the most advanced restoration equipment available to us, which is what enables us to save items that may seem like a lost cause. In the past, we have been able to restore irreplaceable objects such as family photos, documents and art, as well as valuables such as electronics. Some things can’t be replicated, which is why we do our best to keep these sentimental objects intact.

We make sure your home feels like home again. As we have helped many people in the community with losses and damage, we understand all the complex emotions involved. To help make the return home easier, we focus primarily on restoring your house to its pre-damaged state and placing your belongings just how they were before the damage occurred. This will help your house feel like home again so your family can focus on healing.

If you have damages and are feeling overwhelmed, we are here to help. You can call us as soon as you need to in order to begin the restoration process. Contact us today to learn more.

What Sets Our Storm Restoration Methods Apart? | SERVPRO® of Cambridge/Belmont

9/1/2020 (Permalink)

large downed tree laying on top of light brown house Choosing the right restoration company is crucial to getting things back to normal. Call SERVPRO of Cambridge/Belmont to set up an appointment.

Severe weather is a powerful thing, and it can cause significant damage to homes, property and businesses. In recent years, the cost of treating storm damage has continued to rise nationwide, but not treating it can lead to much larger problems with your structures later on.

Choosing the right restoration company is one of the most important things you can do if you have sustained storm damage. They will be responsible for taking care of your building and belongings, as well as making sure that every aspect of the damage is thoroughly handled.

Picking the right company for the job will provide you with great peace of mind and ensure that any damage is properly addressed.

Why We Have Become Leaders in Storm Restoration

Our reputation has been earned over time. We are proud to be not only a member of the local community but also to be considered a leader in the restoration industry as a whole. We have worked hard to earn our reputation, and we are proud of it. After disasters, there are many scams afoot that take advantage of those who are vulnerable, but when you trust us, you can be certain you are getting the best in the business.

Our resources allow us to take on more jobs. If there is a large area that is impacted by a storm, you do not want a company that is struggling to keep up with demand to be in charge of your restoration. Thanks to our national partners, we can handle disasters that are any size with the same service and expertise we always do. When there is a large storm, we can call for backup in the way of extra resources and workforce to handle the issues.

Our emergency response is truly 247. Severe weather never takes a day off, so we won’t either. You can call us 24 hours a day, 365 days a year to report your damage and receive exceptional service, so as soon as you discover you need us, we can be there. No matter what time you discover you have received damage, you can call us and be certain you will receive a rapid response from our expert technicians.

When you have damage from a storm to your home or commercial building, you can always depend on us to handle it. Contact us at any hour to see our exceptional service in action.

What Sets Our Storm Restoration Methods Apart | SERVPRO® of Cambridge/Belmont

8/11/2020 (Permalink)

large downed tree laying on top of light brown house Choosing the right restoration company is crucial to getting things back to normal. Call SERVPRO of Cambridge/Belmont to set up an appointment.

Severe weather is a powerful thing, and it can cause significant damage to homes, property and businesses. In recent years, the cost of treating storm damage has continued to rise nationwide, but not treating it can lead to much larger problems with your structures later on.

Choosing the right restoration company is one of the most important things you can do if you have sustained storm damage. They will be responsible for taking care of your building and belongings, as well as making sure that every aspect of the damage is thoroughly handled.

Picking the right company for the job will provide you with great peace of mind and ensure that any damage is properly addressed.

Why We Have Become Leaders in Storm Restoration

Our reputation has been earned over time. We are proud to be not only a member of the local community but also to be considered a leader in the restoration industry as a whole. We have worked hard to earn our reputation, and we are proud of it. After disasters, there are many scams afoot that take advantage of those who are vulnerable, but when you trust us, you can be certain you are getting the best in the business.

Our resources allow us to take on more jobs. If there is a large area that is impacted by a storm, you do not want a company that is struggling to keep up with demand to be in charge of your restoration. Thanks to our national partners, we can handle disasters that are any size with the same service and expertise we always do. When there is a large storm, we can call for backup in the way of extra resources and workforce to handle the issues.

Our emergency response is truly 247. Severe weather never takes a day off, so we won’t either. You can call us 24 hours a day, 365 days a year to report your damage and receive exceptional service, so as soon as you discover you need us, we can be there. No matter what time you discover you have received damage, you can call us and be certain you will receive a rapid response from our expert technicians.

When you have damage from a storm to your home or commercial building, you can always depend on us to handle it. Contact us at any hour to see our exceptional service in action.

Flooding & Back ups after Heavy Rain

7/31/2020 (Permalink)

sewage diagram of city during dry and wet weather city sewage diagram

The heavy rains that occurred in the Cambridge/Belmont area caused not only flooding but also many sewage back- ups. The town & cities sewage system gets overwhelmed causing the sewage to flow into basements through toilets and sinks. When a storm drain suffers a partial or complete blockage, rain water gets trapped in the pipes and must go somewhere. Unfortunately, the only exit point is the pipe servicing your home that connects to the sewer line. With nowhere left to go it goes up through your pipe, pushing whatever refuse and filth it’s carrying into your basement and other areas of your home. Contact your local plumber to install a backwater valve to prevent this from happening to you! If your basement gets flooded or has sewage issues, please call SERVPRO of Cambridge/Belmont (617) 864-7378 to assist you. Did you know that SERVPRO of Cambridge/Belmont also helps Commercial and Industrial customers?

24 Hour Emergency Water Damage Service

7/31/2020 (Permalink)

logo of 24 7 365 24 Hour Emergency Service. We are here to help!

24 Hour Emergency Water Damage Service

SERVPRO of Cambridge/Belmont is available 24 hours a day for water emergencies, large or small. When you are dealing with water damage, immediate action is crucial. A delay of just a few hours can greatly increase the severity of the water damage.

Call SERVPRO of Cambridge/Belmont Today - (617) 864-7378

We understand that when you call us, you may be feeling confused, stressed, and vulnerable. You need an expert to guide you through this crisis. SERVPRO of Cambridge/Belmont has the specific water damage training and experience to help you through this tough time. We specialize in water damage restoration—in fact, it's the cornerstone of our business.

What to Expect

When you call, we will ask several questions regarding your water damage emergency. These questions will help us determine what equipment and resources to bring, including how many trained SERVPRO Professionals may be needed.

Our SERVPRO Representative will ask several questions:

Your name and contact information

Your insurance information (if applicable)

The street address of the water-damaged home or business

When did the flooding or water damage occur?

What caused the water damage (if known)?

Is there electricity available (on-site)?

About SERVPRO of Cambridge/Belmont

SERVPRO of Cambridge/Belmont specializes in the cleanup and restoration of residential and commercial property after a fire, smoke or water damage event. Our staff is highly trained in property damage restoration. From initial and ongoing training at SERVPRO’s corporate training facility to regular IICRC-industry certification, rest assured our staff is equipped with the knowledge to restore your property.

Know What to Do No Matter Where a Storm Catches You | SERVPRO® of Cambridge/Belmont

7/14/2020 (Permalink)

lightning striking tree protect yourself and your loved ones during a storm

When the sky is clear and the weather is warm, it seems silly to think about thunderstorms ruining the fun—but unfortunately, this happens quite often on hot, humid days, as that creates the ideal condition for a sudden storm to form.

When storms catch people off-guard, they are often extra dangerous because people are not sure of what to do. With these tips, you can make sure you are prepared for a storm anywhere.

Make Sure You Are Prepared for a Storm Anywhere

Know your options for shelter. When you hear that a storm is a possibility and you are somewhere you can wait out the threat, this would be the ideal thing to do. That being said, when storms come up suddenly, this will not always be an option. You can set up shelter in your vehicle with the proper guidelines in mind, enabling you to wait out the storm anywhere you are.

Practice electrical safety. Claps of thunder are caused by lightning strikes, so any thunderstorm has the potential to cause lightning damage. If you are sheltering in a building, unplugging your electronics can help prevent damage from a power surge in case lightning strikes the building. Surge protectors are also a smart thing to invest in, both for your home and your office, in case you are not around when a storm starts.

Avoid direct contact with concrete. While concrete structures do have sturdiness going for them, they also pose risks when it comes to lightning strikes due to their metal framework. When lightning strikes a concrete building, the electricity can transfer from the metal and through the concrete, so be careful to not sit or lean against any concrete surfaces during a storm.

Stay indoors for at least 30 minutes. If you are interrupted by a thunderstorm, you will likely want to get back to your summer fun as soon as you can, but it is important to give yourself ample time in your shelter spot. Lightning can travel nearly 30 miles from the center of a storm cell, so experts recommend waiting at least 30 minutes before heading back outside.

If your home sustains damage due to a storm, you can count on us to help. Contact us at any hour to learn more about our storm restoration process.

Do I need flood insurance?

2/18/2020 (Permalink)

Heavy rain can flood low lying areas very quickly

The fact is – any property can flood. Your home doesn’t have to be less than five feet of water from hurricane flood surges to suffer flood damage. Normal amounts of rainwater can drain under your home, and flood your basement or the lowest floor level, causing flood damage. This kind of flooding can cause mold, increase the risk of termites and cause electrical problems.

More than 75% of homeowners devastated by flooding unfortunately discover they should have had flood insurance. The sad thing, experts say, is that flood insurance is not that expensive – typically $450 to $600 a year for the average home. When you weigh the cost of flood insurance against replacing your entire home $100,000 to $500,000, it only makes sense to buy it, whether you believe you’ll need it or not. “People may say things like, ‘I live on a hill, and I don’t need flood insurance’.

Common reasons people give for not buying flood insurance include:

  • “I’m not in a flood zone.”
  • “I’m not anywhere near water.”
  • “I’ll never need it, it's money wasted.”
  • “My homeowner’s insurance will cover it.”
  • “It’s not available.”
  • “My realtor told me the property would never flood.”

If your home or business has been flooded, please call SERVPRO of Cambridge/Belmont (617) 864-7378

Did you know there are different types of lightning?

2/13/2020 (Permalink)

Lightning over the night sky

Lightning is an electrical discharge caused by imbalances between storm clouds and the ground, or within the clouds themselves. Most lightning occurs within the clouds.

"Sheet lightning" describes a distant bolt that lights up an entire cloud base. Other visible bolts may appear as bead, ribbon, or rocket lightning. During a storm, colliding particles of rain, ice, or snow inside storm clouds increase the imbalance between storm clouds and the ground, and often negatively charge the lower reaches of storm clouds. Objects on the ground, like steeples, trees, and the Earth itself, become positively charged—creating an imbalance that nature seeks to remedy by passing current between the two charges.

Lightning is extremely hot—a flash can heat the air around it to temperatures five times hotter than the sun’s surface. This heat causes surrounding air to rapidly expand and vibrate, which creates the pealing thunder we hear a short time after seeing a lightning flash.

Types of Lightning

Cloud-to-ground lightning bolts are a common phenomenon—about 100 strike Earth’s surface every single second—yet their power is extraordinary. Each bolt can contain up to one billion volts of electricity.

A typical cloud-to-ground lightning bolt begins when a step-like series of negative charges, called a stepped leader, races downward from the bottom of a storm cloud toward the Earth along a channel at about 200,000 mph (300,000 kph). Each of these segments is about 150 feet (46 meters) long.

When the lowermost step comes within 150 feet (46 meters) of a positively charged object, it is met by a climbing surge of positive electricity, called a streamer, which can rise up through a building, a tree, or even a person.

When the two connect, electrical current flows as negative charges fly down the channel towards earth and a visible flash of lightning streaks upward at some 200,000,000 mph (300,000,000 kph), transferring electricity as lightning in the process.

Some types of lightning, including the most common types, never leave the clouds but travel between differently charged areas within or between clouds. Other rare forms can be sparked by extreme forest fires, volcanic eruptions, and snowstorms. Ball lightning, a small, charged sphere that floats, glows, and bounces along oblivious to the laws of gravity or physics, still puzzles scientists.

About one to 20 cloud-to-ground lightning bolts is "positive lightning," a type that originates in the positively charged tops of storm clouds. These strikes reverse the charge flow of typical lightning bolts and are far stronger and more destructive. Positive lightning can stretch across the sky and strike "out of the blue" more than 10 miles from the storm cloud where it was born.

If you have water or fire damage, please call SERVPRO of Cambridge/Belmont (617) 864-7378

Cold weather preparation for your business

1/15/2020 (Permalink)

Make sure you clean the snow off the roof

Cold Weather and Freeze Alert

Keep your heating systems operating

Keep your building and equipment warm. Heating systems are the lifeline of your business during cold conditions. If they fail, disaster could strike.

Immediate action required:

  • All piping must be insulated. Install new and replace damaged insulation and don’t forget to examine your sprinkler system.
  • Inspect all outside dampers for proper operation.
  • Clear and protect all outside vents from ice and snow accumulation.
  • Heat requires power. If generators are unavailable, make arrangements to obtain an electrical portable heating during outages.

Safeguard business equipment during power outages

Voltage surge protection is necessary at all times – especially during cold, freezing conditions. Severe weather can cause power loss and downed wires, disrupting your business’ power supply. When electricity is restored, the sudden surge of power can literally destroy the modem, high-tech equipment

Your business relies on.

Immediate action required:

  • Unplug it. Anticipate voltage surges during severe weather. The best solution is equipment isolation – turn it off and unplug it. If you need to keep equipment running, installing surge protectors can provide protection.
  • Inspect building. Close all windows, doors and outside dampers. Schedule regular building checks during storms and cold weather. Arrange for snow and ice removal, including the roof.
  • Who’s responsible? Ensure accountability by designating personal responsibility for loss prevention. Business and building owners must work together with facilities and maintenance people.
  • Provide emergency telephone numbers. Collect and distribute a list of emergency phone numbers and contacts, such as snow removal, heating system Repair Company, utility company, and the weather bureau.
  • Anticipate flooding. Severe and cold weather can cause flooding. Move susceptible equipment or stock to an alternate location, where water cannot reach it.
  • Always have cold-weather gear on hand. – Have plenty of gloves, hats, emergency blankets and flashlights available.

If you have water or fire issues, please call SERVPRO of Cambridge/Belmont (617) 864-7378

Ice dams in New Emgland

12/19/2019 (Permalink)

Snow melting causing ice dams and icicles

Ice dams form when melted snow refreezes at roof edges. Anyone who has lived in cold climates has seen ice dams. However, most of us don’t stop to understand why these ice bands form until they damage our homes.

Three things are required for an ice dam to form: snow, heat to melt the snow and cold to refreeze the melted snow into solid ice. Ice dams can form when as little as 1 or 2 inches of snow accumulates on a roof – if the roof is poorly insulated and air sealed, and the snowfall is followed by several days of sub-freezing temperatures. Ice dams develop as snow on the upper part of the roof melts. Water runs down the roof slope under the blanket of snow and refreezes into a band of ice at the roof’s edge creating a “dam”. Additional snow-melt pools against the dam and eventually leaks into the building through the roof or roof trim.

The reason ice-dams form along the roof’s lower edge, usually above the overhang, is straight-forward. The upper roof surface is at a temperature that is above freezing. And the lower part of the roof surface (along the eaves) is below freezing. The upper roof surface is located directly above the living space. Heat lost from the house warms this section of the roof, melting snow in this area. During periods of sub-freezing temperature the lower regions of the roof deck remain at sub-freezing ambient temperatures. Roof overhangs are not warmed by indoor heat-loss.

Deeper snow and cold temperatures increase the likelihood and size of ice dams. Every inch of snow that accumulates on the roof’s surface insulates the roof deck a little more, trapping more indoor heat beneath the roof deck and warming the roof sheathing. Each inch of snow has an R-value of approximately 0.5 – 1. The worst ice dams occur when deep snow accompanies cold weather.  Here is an example to provide a sense of scale: A poorly insulated and unvented R-20 cathedral roof with 10 inches of snow can result with serious ice damming.  In this example, 10 inches of snow adds ~between R-5 and R-10 to the roof system resulting in a total roof R of 25 – 30. The layer of snow holds indoor heat below the sheathing and could warm the roof sheathing above freezing in the area over the living space. If the inside temperature is 70 degrees and the outside 20 degrees (50 degree differential), the temperature of the roof sheathing would be between 5/25 and 10/30 of the way from 20 degrees toward 70 degrees. In other words, the roof should temperature should be between 30 and 37 degrees over the living space. Snow will probably melt under these conditions. Yet, the temperature of the roof over the unheated overhangs is 20 degrees, the same as the outdoor temperature. The melt water will freeze when it reaches that part of the roof. Deeper snow makes things worse. More insulation makes the situation better. You can do the math for a variety of snow depths and various indoor/outdoor temperature conditions to get a sense of how the variables are related. The trick is to keep the entire roof below freezing if possible. Roof venting helps and is discussed below.

If you have water damage from Ice Dams, please call SERVPRO of Cambridge/Belmont (617) 864-7378

Fast moving storm in Cambridge, MA

8/1/2019 (Permalink)

Tree branch from recent storm

Last week’s microburst that occurred in the city of Cambridge resulted in about 50 limbs or branches down. Forestry crews are responding. There are also several wires down and loss of power in certain locations. The City Electrician, Eversource and SERVPRO of Cambridge/Belmont are responding. The above picture shows the damage that one of the downed trees caused. SERVPRO Of Cambridge/Belmont responded to a frantic call from the homeowner informing us that a tree came right through the kitchen ceiling. The SERVPRO technicians were at the Cambridge home in less than an hour. They cleaned up the debris and installed drying equipment.

To report a fallen tree or limb, call 617-349-3300.

To report a down wired, call 911 or 617-349-3300

To report loss of power, please call Eversourse at 1-800-592-2000

If you have had roof or water damage due to the Microburst please call SERVPRO of Cambridge/Belmont (617) 864-7378

A microburst is a small downdraft that moves in a way opposite to a tornado. Microbursts are found in strong thunderstorms. There are two types of microbursts within a thunderstorm: wet microbursts and dry microbursts. They go through three stages in their cycle, the downburst, outburst, and cushion stages. A microburst often has high winds that can knock over fully grown trees. They usually last from a couple of seconds to several minutes.

Floods in Belmont, MA

7/16/2019 (Permalink)

Diagram of a city sewer system

The heavy rains that occurred in the Cambridge/Belmont area caused not only flooding but also many sewage back- ups. The town & cities sewage system gets overwhelmed causing the sewage to flow into basements through toilets and sinks. When a storm drain suffers a partial or complete blockage, rain water gets trapped in the pipes and must go somewhere. Unfortunately, the only exit point is the pipe servicing your home that connects to the sewer line. With nowhere left to go it goes up through your pipe, pushing whatever refuse and filth it’s carrying into your basement and other areas of your home. Contact your local plumber to install a backwater valve to prevent this from happening to you! If your basement gets flooded or has sewage issues, please call SERVPRO of Cambridge/Belmont (617) 864-7378 to assist you. Did you know that SERVPRO of Cambridge/Belmont also helps Commercial and Industrial customers?

It's Lightning Season

7/16/2019 (Permalink)

Lightning in the night sky

Lightning is an electrical discharge caused by imbalances between storm clouds and the ground, or within the clouds themselves. Most lightning occurs within the clouds.

"Sheet lightning" describes a distant bolt that lights up an entire cloud base. Other visible bolts may appear as bead, ribbon, or rocket lightning. During a storm, colliding particles of rain, ice, or snow inside storm clouds increase the imbalance between storm clouds and the ground, and often negatively charge the lower reaches of storm clouds. Objects on the ground, like steeples, trees, and the Earth itself, become positively charged—creating an imbalance that nature seeks to remedy by passing current between the two charges.

Lightning is extremely hot—a flash can heat the air around it to temperatures five times hotter than the sun’s surface. This heat causes surrounding air to rapidly expand and vibrate, which creates the pealing thunder we hear a short time after seeing a lightning flash.

Types of Lightning

Cloud-to-ground lightning bolts are a common phenomenon—about 100 strike Earth’s surface every single second—yet their power is extraordinary. Each bolt can contain up to one billion volts of electricity.

A typical cloud-to-ground lightning bolt begins when a step-like series of negative charges, called a stepped leader, races downward from the bottom of a storm cloud toward the Earth along a channel at about 200,000 mph (300,000 kph). Each of these segments is about 150 feet (46 meters) long.

When the lowermost step comes within 150 feet (46 meters) of a positively charged object, it is met by a climbing surge of positive electricity, called a streamer, which can rise up through a building, a tree, or even a person.

When the two connect, electrical current flows as negative charges fly down the channel towards earth and a visible flash of lightning streaks upward at some 200,000,000 mph (300,000,000 kph), transferring electricity as lightning in the process.

Some types of lightning, including the most common types, never leave the clouds but travel between differently charged areas within or between clouds. Other rare forms can be sparked by extreme forest fires, volcanic eruptions, and snowstorms. Ball lightning, a small, charged sphere that floats, glows, and bounces along oblivious to the laws of gravity or physics, still puzzles scientists.

About one to 20 cloud-to-ground lightning bolts is "positive lightning," a type that originates in the positively charged tops of storm clouds. These strikes reverse the charge flow of typical lightning bolts and are far stronger and more destructive. Positive lightning can stretch across the sky and strike "out of the blue" more than 10 miles from the storm cloud where it was born.

 If you have had damage from a lightning strike, please call SERVPRO of Cambridge/Belmont (617) 864-7378

Last week's Microburst causes damage in the Cambridge/Belmont area

7/15/2019 (Permalink)

Downed Tree from microburst

Last week’s microburst that occurred in the city of Cambridge resulted in about 50 limbs or branches down. Forestry crews are responding. There are also several wires down and loss of power in certain locations. The City Electrician, Eversource and SERVPRO of Cambridge/Belmont are responding. The above picture shows the damage that one of the downed trees caused. SERVPRO Of Cambridge/Belmont responded to a frantic call from the homeowner informing us that a tree came right through the kitchen ceiling. The SERVPRO technicians were at the Cambridge home in less than an hour. They cleaned up the debris and installed drying equipment.

To report a fallen tree or limb, call 617-349-3300.

To report a down wired, call 911 or 617-349-3300

To report loss of power, please call Eversourse at 1-800-592-2000

If you have had roof or water damage due to the Microburst please call SERVPRO of Cambridge/Belmont (617) 864-7378

A microburst is a small downdraft that moves in a way opposite to a tornado. Microbursts are found in strong thunderstorms. There are two types of microbursts within a thunderstorm: wet microbursts and dry microbursts. They go through three stages in their cycle, the downburst, outburst, and cushion stages. A microburst often has high winds that can knock over fully grown trees. They usually last from a couple of seconds to several minutes.

Emergency services after a storm

7/15/2019 (Permalink)

Flooded garage due to a storm

24 Hour Emergency Water Damage Service

SERVPRO of Cambridge/Belmont is available 24 hours a day for water emergencies, large or small. When you are dealing with water damage, immediate action is crucial. A delay of just a few hours can greatly increase the severity of the water damage.

We Answer the Phone Ready to Help

Call SERVPRO of Cambridge/Belmont Today - (617) 864-7378

We understand that when you call us, you may be feeling confused, stressed, and vulnerable. You need an expert to guide you through this crisis. SERVPRO of Cambridge/Belmont has the specific water damage training and experience to help you through this tough time. We specialize in water damage restoration—in fact, it's the cornerstone of our business.

What to Expect

When you call, we will ask several questions regarding your water damage emergency. These questions will help us determine what equipment and resources to bring, including how many trained SERVPRO Professionals may be needed.

Our SERVPRO Representative will ask several questions:

Your name and contact information

Your insurance information (if applicable)

The street address of the water-damaged home or business

When did the flooding or water damage occur?

What caused the water damage (if known)?

Is there electricity available (on-site)?

About SERVPRO of Cambridge/Belmont

SERVPRO of Cambridge/Belmont specializes in the cleanup and restoration of residential and commercial property after a fire, smoke or water damage event. Our staff is highly trained in property damage restoration. From initial and ongoing training at SERVPRO’s corporate training facility to regular IICRC-industry certification, rest assured our staff is equipped with the knowledge to restore your property.

Storm hits Belmont, Cambridge area

7/1/2019 (Permalink)

Drying equipment doing the work

The rain came quickly and only lasted a few minutes but it created significant damage to the Cambridge/Belmont area. Diane, the office manager, arrived in her office Monday morning. Diane felt her feet squish as she walked across the wet carpet. The rain was so overwhelming that the roof drain overflowed causing water to pour down into the office. She made a call to SERVPRO of Cambridge/Belmont and explained that she needed her office to be operational as it was their busy season. The SERVPRO technicians arrived within the hour. Melvin, the crew chief, tested walls and ceilings for excessive moisture, extracted the water from the carpets and left equipment to dry the wet walls, ceiling and carpet. Melvin came back the next day to monitor the drying progress. The walls and carpet were still wet. He came back again the next day tested the areas with a moisture meter and he found all areas to be dry. The crew shampooed the carpet and everything was back to normal in the office. If you have water or fire damage in your business, please call SERVPRO of Cambridge/Belmont (617) 864-7378

The rain came quickly and only lasted a few minutes but it created significant damage to the Cambridge/Belmont area. Diane, the office manager, arrived in her office Monday morning. Diane felt her feet squish as she walked across the wet carpet. The rain was so overwhelming that the roof drain overflowed causing water to pour down into the office. She made a call to SERVPRO of Cambridge/Belmont and explained that she needed her office to be operational as it was their busy season. The SERVPRO technicians arrived within the hour. Melvin, the crew chief, tested walls and ceilings for excessive moisture, extracted the water from the carpets and left equipment to dry the wet walls, ceiling and carpet. Melvin came back the next day to monitor the drying progress. The walls and carpet were still wet. He came back again the next day tested the areas with a moisture meter and he found all areas to be dry. The crew shampooed the carpet and everything was back to normal in the office. If you have water or fire damage in your business, please call SERVPRO of Cambridge/Belmont (617) 864-7378

The rain came quickly and only lasted a few minutes but it created significant damage to the Cambridge/Belmont area. Diane, the office manager, arrived in her office Monday morning. Diane felt her feet squish as she walked across the wet carpet. The rain was so overwhelming that the roof drain overflowed causing water to pour down into the office. She made a call to SERVPRO of Cambridge/Belmont and explained that she needed her office to be operational as it was their busy season. The SERVPRO technicians arrived within the hour. Melvin, the crew chief, tested walls and ceilings for excessive moisture, extracted the water from the carpets and left equipment to dry the wet walls, ceiling and carpet. Melvin came back the next day to monitor the drying progress. The walls and carpet were still wet. He came back again the next day tested the areas with a moisture meter and he found all areas to be dry. The crew shampooed the carpet and everything was back to normal in the office. If you have water or fire damage in your business, please call SERVPRO of Cambridge/Belmont (617) 864-7378

What is lightning?

8/2/2018 (Permalink)

Lightning contarsted with the night sky

Lightning is an electrical discharge caused by imbalances between storm clouds and the ground, or within the clouds themselves. Most lightning occurs within the clouds.

"Sheet lightning" describes a distant bolt that lights up an entire cloud base. Other visible bolts may appear as bead, ribbon, or rocket lightning. During a storm, colliding particles of rain, ice, or snow inside storm clouds increase the imbalance between storm clouds and the ground, and often negatively charge the lower reaches of storm clouds. Objects on the ground, like steeples, trees, and the Earth itself, become positively charged—creating an imbalance that nature seeks to remedy by passing current between the two charges.

Lightning is extremely hot—a flash can heat the air around it to temperatures five times hotter than the sun’s surface. This heat causes surrounding air to rapidly expand and vibrate, which creates the pealing thunder we hear a short time after seeing a lightning flash.

Types of Lightning

Cloud-to-ground lightning bolts are a common phenomenon—about 100 strike Earth’s surface every single second—yet their power is extraordinary. Each bolt can contain up to one billion volts of electricity.

A typical cloud-to-ground lightning bolt begins when a step-like series of negative charges, called a stepped leader, races downward from the bottom of a storm cloud toward the Earth along a channel at about 200,000 mph (300,000 kph). Each of these segments is about 150 feet (46 meters) long.

When the lowermost step comes within 150 feet (46 meters) of a positively charged object, it is met by a climbing surge of positive electricity, called a streamer, which can rise up through a building, a tree, or even a person.

When the two connect, electrical current flows as negative charges fly down the channel towards earth and a visible flash of lightning streaks upward at some 200,000,000 mph (300,000,000 kph), transferring electricity as lightning in the process.

Some types of lightning, including the most common types, never leave the clouds but travel between differently charged areas within or between clouds. Other rare forms can be sparked by extreme forest fires, volcanic eruptions, and snowstorms. Ball lightning, a small, charged sphere that floats, glows, and bounces along oblivious to the laws of gravity or physics, still puzzles scientists.

About one to 20 cloud-to-ground lightning bolts is "positive lightning," a type that originates in the positively charged tops of storm clouds. These strikes reverse the charge flow of typical lightning bolts and are far stronger and more destructive. Positive lightning can stretch across the sky and strike "out of the blue" more than 10 miles from the storm cloud where it was born.

 If you have had damage from a lightning strike, please call SERVPRO of Cambridge/Belmont (617) 864-7378

Should I Waterproof My Basement?

8/2/2018 (Permalink)

Sealed basement wall

If your basement smells wet or musty, one might be curious about why this may be happening and what the root of it is. Many companies advertise about waterproofing basements walls. Is it really possible to dry out a basement simply by sealing the walls?

Yes, it is possible to make sure you basement stay dry and not musty. SERVPRO of Cambridge/Belmont (617-864-7378) can help.  We are here to make sure that your basement stays dry especially after a tragedy.  We are professionals that will get your space back to looking “like it never happened”. 

There are four types of Interior Waterproofing:

1.Concrete waterproofing coatings:

2.Silicate based concrete sealers,

3.Waterproof paint

4.Plastic sheets and panels

These are all solutions that can help prevent water from getting into your basement and have the ability to have a finished basement and add value to your house. If you have water damage let SERVPRO of Cambridge/Belmont (617-864-7378) help.

Tuesday's storm caused widespread flooding

7/18/2018 (Permalink)

The storm flooded this Cambridge home

The heat and humidity Tuesday will give way to potentially severe thunderstorms in the afternoon in Massachusetts, forecasters say.

 “A line of strong thunderstorms is expected to develop in northwest Massachusetts around noon and then progress slowly southeastward across most of southern New England this afternoon and evening,” the National Weather Service wrote. “Any storms will be capable of producing 1 to 2 inches of rain in less than an hour.”

 The National Weather Service said localized flash flooding and damaging winds are concerns with the sweeping storms.

 The Flash Flood Watch has been expanded to include the Boston and Providence corridor. With widespread showers and thunderstorms today, 1"-2" of rain is expected in a short period of time. Some places could see 2"-4" with rainfall rates around 2"/hr. This could lead to localized flash flooding, especially in urban areas.

 The strongest storms are forecast in western and northern Massachusetts, and the storms are expected to weaken as they approach southeastern Massachusetts and Rhode Island.

 If your home or business was affected by yesterday’s storm, please call SERVPRO of Cambridge/Belmont (617) 864-7378 to assist you.

The dangers of a lightning strike

7/17/2018 (Permalink)

Spectacular picture of lightning lighting up the sky

Lightning is not only spectacular, it’s dangerous. About 2,000 people are killed worldwide by lightning each year. Hundreds more survive strikes but suffer from a variety of lasting symptoms, including memory loss, dizziness, weakness, numbness, and other life-altering ailments. Strikes can cause cardiac arrest and severe burns, but 9 of every 10 people survive. The average American has about a 1 in 5,000 chance of being struck by lightning during a lifetime.

Lightning's extreme heat will vaporize the water inside a tree, creating steam that may blow the tree apart. Cars are havens from lightning—but not for the reason that most believe. Tires conduct current, as do metal frames that carry a charge harmlessly to the ground.

Many houses are grounded by rods and other protection that conduct a lightning bolts electricity harmlessly to the ground. Homes may also be inadvertently grounded by plumbing, gutters, or other materials. Grounded buildings offer protection, but occupants who touch running water or use a landline phone may be shocked by conducted electricity.

If your home or business is struck by lightning, please call SERVPRO of Cambridge/Belmont (617) 864-7378

It's Hurricane Season

7/16/2018 (Permalink)

Satellite photo of a hurricane

As the 2018 Atlantic hurricane season begins, scientists are worried that U.S. coastal communities could face more super storms with winds, storm surges and rainfall so intense that current warning categories don't fully capture the threat.

This year's forecast is about average and much more subdued than last summer's hyperactive season turned out to be, partly due to cooler ocean temperatures in the tropical Atlantic, as well as a nascent El Niño pattern. But that doesn't mean an individual storm won't blow up to exceptional strength, as Andrew did before striking Florida in 1992, an otherwise relatively quiet year.

 Heat trapped by the increasing concentration of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere is raising the chances of that happening, said Penn State climate scientist Michael Mann. 

A new review of global data on hurricanes shows that since 1980, the number of storms with winds stronger than 200 kilometers per hour (124 mph, or a strong Category 3) have doubled, and those with winds stronger than 250 kilometers per hour (155 mph) have tripled.

If a storm hits your area, please call SERVPRO of Cambridge/Belmont (617) 864-7378 to assist you with the cleanup.

Causes of Sewage backups in basements

7/16/2018 (Permalink)

Diagram of a sewage system

Heavy rains that occurred in the Cambridge/Belmont area caused not only flooding but also many sewage backups. The town & cities sewage system gets overwhelmed causing the sewage to flow into basements through toilets and sinks. When a storm drain suffers a partial or complete blockage, rain water gets trapped in the pipes and must go somewhere. Unfortunately, the only exit point is the pipe servicing your home that connects to the sewer line. With nowhere left to go it goes up through your pipe, pushing whatever refuse and filth it’s carrying into your basement and other areas of your home. Contact your local plumber to install a backwater valve to prevent this from happening to you! If your basement gets flooded or has sewage issues, please call SERVPRO of Cambridge/Belmont (617) 864-7378 to assist you. Did you know that SERVPRO of Cambridge/Belmont also helps Commercial and Industrial customers?

Recent Storm in Cambridge, MA

7/2/2018 (Permalink)

Downed tree as a result of the recent storm

Yesterday’s microburst that occurred in the city of Cambridge resulted in about 50 limbs or branches down. Forestry crews are responding. There are also several wires down and loss of power in certain locations. The City Electrician, Eversource and SERVPRO of Cambridge/Belmont are responding. The above picture shows the damage that one of the downed trees caused. SERVPRO Of Cambridge/Belmont responded to a frantic call from the homeowner informing us that a tree came right through the kitchen ceiling. The SERVPRO technicians were at the Cambridge home in less than an hour. They cleaned up the debris and installed drying equipment.

To report a fallen tree or limb, call 617-349-3300.

To report a down wired, call 911 or 617-349-3300

To report loss of power, please call Eversourse at 1-800-592-2000

If you have had roof or water damage due to the Microburst please call SERVPRO of Cambridge/Belmont (617) 864-7378

A microburst is a small downdraft that moves in a way opposite to a tornado. Microbursts are found in strong thunderstorms. There are two types of microbursts within a thunderstorm: wet microbursts and dry microbursts. They go through three stages in their cycle, the downburst, outburst, and cushion stages. A microburst often has high winds that can knock over fully grown trees. They usually last from a couple of seconds to several minutes.

Early-season storms one indicator of active Atlantic hurricane season ahead

8/15/2017 (Permalink)

Satellite picture of a hurricane in the Atlantic

Today NOAA issued the scheduled update for its 2017 hurricane season outlook. Forecasters are now predicting a higher likelihood of an above-normal season, and they increased the predicted number of named storms and major hurricanes. The season has the potential to be extremely active, and could be the most active since 2010.

Forecasters now say there is a 60-percent chance of an above-normal season (compared to the May prediction of 45 percent chance), with 14-19 named storms (increased from the May predicted range of 11-17) and 2-5 major hurricanes (increased from the May predicted range of 2-4). A prediction for 5-9 hurricanes remains unchanged from the initial May outlook.  

“We’re now entering the peak of the season when the bulk of the storms usually form,” said Gerry Bell, Ph.D., lead seasonal hurricane forecaster at NOAA’s Climate Prediction Center. “The wind and air patterns in the area of the tropical Atlantic and Caribbean where many storms develop are very conducive to an above-normal season. This is in part because the chance of an El Nino forming, which tends to prevent storms from strengthening, has dropped significantly from May.”

Bell noted other factors that point to an above-normal season include warmer waters across the tropical Atlantic than models previously predicted and higher predicted activity from available models.

In just the first nine weeks of this season there have been six named storms, which is half the number of storms during an average six-month season and double the number of storms that would typically form by early August. An average Atlantic hurricane season, which runs from June 1-November 30, produces 12 named storms, of which six become hurricanes, including three major hurricanes.

“Today’s updated outlook underscores the need for everyone to know their true vulnerabilities to storms and storm surge,” said FEMA Administrator Brock Long. “As we enter the height of hurricane season, it’s important for everyone to know who issues evacuation orders in their community, heed the warnings, update their insurance and have a preparedness plan.”

The updated outlook is based on the current and evolving atmospheric and oceanic conditions, the most recent model predictions, and pre-and early-season storm activity. The numbers announced today include the season activity to-date. The Atlantic basin has seen six named storms (Arlene in April; Bret and Cindy in June; Don and Emily in July; and Franklin in August). Two of these storms, Cindy and Emily, struck the United States. Cindy made landfall on June 22 at the Louisiana-Texas border and caused heavy rain, inland flooding and multiple tornado outbreaks. Emily made landfall on July 31 in Anna Maria Island, Florida. Franklin is predicted to make landfall in Mexico overnight as a hurricane.

Today’s update also decreases the chance of a near-normal season from 35 percent to 30 percent, and a below-normal season from 20 percent to only 10 percent from the initial outlook issued in May.

As we move into the peak of hurricane season, when hurricanes are most frequent and at their strongest, NOAA urges coastal residents to make sure they have their hurricane preparedness plans in place and to monitor the latest forecasts.

If you are affected by a hurricane, please call SERVPRO of Cambridge/Belmont (617) 864-7378

Lightning Science: Five Ways Lightning Strikes People

8/9/2017 (Permalink)

Lightning filling up the sky

Direct Strike

A person struck directly by lightning becomes a part of the main lightning discharge channel. Most often, direct strikes occur to victims who are in open areas. Direct strikes are not as common as the other ways people are struck by lightning, but they are potentially the most deadly. In most direct strikes, a portion of the current moves along and just over the skin surface (called flashover) and a portion of the current moves through the body--usually through the cardiovascular and/or nervous systems. The heat produced when lightning moves over the skin can produce burns, but the current moving through the body is of greatest concern. While the ability to survive any lightning strike is related to immediate medical attention, the amount of current moving through the body is also a factor.

Side Flash

A side flash (also called a side splash) occurs when lightning strikes a taller object near the victim and a portion of the current jumps from taller object to the victim. In essence, the person acts as a “short circuit” for some of energy in the lightning discharge. Side flashes generally occur when the victim is within a foot or two of the object that is struck. Most often, side flash victims have taken shelter under a tree to avoid rain or hail.

Ground Current

When lightning strikes a tree or other object, much of the energy travels outward from the strike along the ground surface. This is known as the ground current. Anyone outside near a lightning strike is potentially a victim of ground current. In addition, ground current can travels in garage floors with conductive materials. Because the ground current affects a much larger area than the other causes of lightning casualties, the ground current causes the most lightning deaths and injuries. Ground current also kills many farm animals. Typically, the lightning enters the body at the contact point closest to the lightning strike, travels through the cardiovascular and/or nervous systems, and exits the body at the contact point farthest from the lightning. The greater the distance between contact points, the greater the potential for death or serious injury. Because large farm animals have a relatively large body-span, ground current from a nearby lightning strike is often fatal to livestock.

Conduction

Lightning can travel long distances in wires or other metal surfaces. Metal does not attract lightning, but it provides a path for the lightning to follow. Most indoor lightning casualties and some outdoor casualties are due to conduction. Whether inside or outside, anyone in contact with anything connected to metal wires, plumbing, or metal surfaces that extend outside is at risk. This includes anything that plugs into an electrical outlet, water faucets and showers, corded phones, and windows and doors.

Streamers

While not as common as the other types of lightning injuries, people caught in “streamers” are at risk of being killed or injured by lightning. Streamers develop as the downward-moving leader approaches the ground. Typically, only one of the streamers makes contact with the leader as it approaches the ground and provides the path for the bright return stroke; however, when the main channel discharges, so do all the other streamers in the area. If a person is part of one of these streamers, they could be killed or injured during the streamer discharge even though the lightning channel was not completed between the cloud and the upward streamer.

 If you are a homeowner, property or facilities manager and you are affected by lightning please call SERVPRO of Cambridge/Belmont (617)864-7378 to assist you

NOAA METEOROLOGIST BOB CASE, THE MAN WHO NAMED THE PERFECT STORM

8/3/2017 (Permalink)

Radar picture of the storm.

June 16, 2000 — The conditions were "perfect" for a monstrous storm, a meteorological time bomb that would explode in the northern Atlantic Ocean creating waves ten stories high and imperiling the New England fleet. This was the assessment of Bob Case, a NOAA National Weather Service meteorologist at the Boston, Mass. forecast office, who, with his weather service colleagues in late October 1991, began warning the public of a storm that would take on epic proportions.

"It was an unprecedented set of circumstances," the now-retired weatherman said. "A strong disturbance associated with a cold front moved along the U.S.-Canadian border on October 27 and passed through New England pretty much without incident. At the same time, a huge high pressure system was forecast to build over southeast Canada. When a low pressure system along the front moved into the Maritimes southeast of Nova Scotia, it began to intensify due to the cold dry air introduced from the north," according to Case.

"These circumstances alone, could have created a strong storm," Case said. "But then, like throwing gasoline on a fire, a dying hurricane Grace delivered immeasurable tropical energy to create the perfect storm."

With all of the contributing factors coming together at just the right time, in less than 24 hours, the storm exploded to epic proportions and then headed toward the coast," the meteorologist said, adding that if any of the components were out of sync, the epic storm would not have happened."

While NOAA's National Weather Service was warning of a storm of huge proportions, New England was enjoying unusually nice weather for late October—a beautiful late autumn day with plenty of sunshine and a northeast breeze, Case explained. "There was a certain amount of skepticism to our warnings of what turned out to be one of the North Atlantic's most powerful storms."

One of Case's colleagues at the Boston office was Walt Drag, a forecaster who shared his passion for meteorology. "Walt had a good handle on it early and the office put out warnings of a big storm," Case said. "This is an area well known for breeding tremendous storms and we could see it coming together on the satellite images and computer model information from the national center in Washington."

"You knew something bad was going to happen," said Ross Dickman another NWS meteorologist who worked the storm. "I remember seeing waves crashing over the seawall at Winthrop (Mass.) sending spray a hundred feet into the air. It was incredible."

An interesting aspect of the huge system was its retrograde motion not away from the New England Coast, but toward it. "It was difficult for us to convey the magnitude of the event to the public," Case said. "Not too many people could fathom–or believe–100-foot waves and hurricane force winds, 70-80 miles-per-hour plus, in a storm that was heading from east to west. "You were looking at a set of meteorological circumstances that come together maybe every 50-100 years."

Flooded basements during heavy rain storms

7/24/2017 (Permalink)

Diagram of Public sewer system

The heavy rains that occurred in the Cambridge/Belmont area caused not only flooding but also many sewage back ups. The town & cities sewage system gets overwhelmed causing the sewage to flow into basements through toilets and sinks. When a storm drain suffers a partial or complete blockage, rain water gets trapped in the pipes and must go somewhere. Unfortunately, the only exit point is the pipe servicing your home that connects to the sewer line. With nowhere left to go it goes up through your pipe, pushing whatever refuse and filth it’s carrying into your basement and other areas of your home. Contact your local plumber to install a backwater valve to prevent this from happening to you! If your basement gets flooded or has sewage issues, please call SERVPRO of Cambridge/Belmont (617) 864-7378 to assist you. Did you know that SERVPRO of Cambridge/Belmont also helps Commercial and Industrial customers?

Wednesday night's storm causes flooding in Cambridge, MA

7/14/2017 (Permalink)

Storm caused flooding

Wednesday night’s storm caused street flooding, flooded basements and sewage to be backed up into basements. Local restoration companies like SERVPRO of Cambridge/Belmont were busy helping homeowners and businesses with storm related issues. Storm related events that cause flooding or sewage back up problems are not typically covered by insurance. Specialty policies or endorsements must be in place prior to a potential claim.

Precautions to prevent future flooding or damage

Certain preventive measures can be taken to prevent a City sewer from backing up into your basement during or after a heavy rain. Some are low cost, while others require corrective plumbing work.

  • Make sure sewer trap plugs are fit tightly on the house trap. Replace old ill-fitting sewer trap plugs with fit-all plugs.
  • If the house sewer line is solely for sanitary use (not for any rain water flow) a back-water check valve can be installed in front (the street side) of the house trap.
  • If the house sewer in question is also for storm water (rain water) flow and there are plumbing fixtures in the basement (such as a toilet, shower, or a sink) backwater check valves can be installed for individual plumbing fixtures.

What is a backwater check valve?

A backwater check valve is a self-operating valve that only allows for water flow in one direction. If properly maintained it will prevent water from flowing in the opposite direction thereby preventing a sewer backup from a public sewer system.

A backwater check valve should be cleaned every 6 months to a year, a task easily performed by a non-professional by removing a few screws. No special tools or skills are required for maintenance on a backwater check valve.

This relatively low-cost installation can prevent heavy rain from causing damage to your house ever again. If your basement gets flooded or has sewage back up, please call SERVPRO of Cambridge/Belmont (617) 864-7378 to assist you.

Microburst downs trees in Cambridge, MA

6/14/2017 (Permalink)

Tree pierces kitchen ceiling

Yesterday’s microburst that occurred in the city of Cambridge resulted in about 50 limbs or branches down. Forestry crews are responding. There are also several wires down and loss of power in certain locations. The City Electrician, Eversource and SERVPRO of Cambridge/Belmont are responding. The above picture shows the damage that one of the downed trees caused. SERVPRO Of Cambridge/Belmont responded to a frantic call from the homeowner informing us that a tree came right through the kitchen ceiling. The SERVPRO technicians were at the Cambridge home in less than an hour. They cleaned up the debris and installed drying equipment.

To report a fallen tree or limb, call 617-349-3300.

To report a down wired, call 911 or 617-349-3300

To report loss of power, please call Eversourse at 1-800-592-2000

If you have had roof or water damage due to the Microburst please call SERVPRO of Cambridge/Belmont (617) 864-7378

A microburst is a small downdraft that moves in a way opposite to a tornado. Microbursts are found in strong thunderstorms. There are two types of microbursts within a thunderstorm: wet microbursts and dry microbursts. They go through three stages in their cycle, the downburst, outburst, and cushion stages. A microburst often has high winds that can knock over fully grown trees. They usually last from a couple of seconds to several minutes.